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Budget:

Small project <800

Posted on

8/23/16 9:32 AM

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Description

Comic strips - 6 x 4 panels / German Expat 

Budget: approx. 120/- USD (Euro 110,- / Rs. 8,500/-).


***If interested, pls. briefly summarize what you have understood + send some samples of your work. With your quote be clear what is included in your offering. Thank you. ***


Cartoon strip briefing

We are authoring a series of books on doing business in India; our first volume dealt with the expat in Delhi / NCR and appeared in Jun 2016 – our next book is on the Mumbai and Pune region. It is for this Mumbai volume that we are seeking a cartoonist.

Our book (format: 14,8 x 21 cm) has 6 chapters. We are looking for a cartoon strip / comic strip to open each chapter.


•    Each strip should be b/w (black and white) and consist of 4 panels (= 24 panels altogether)

•    Ideally, each strip should have a narrative sequence and end in a punchline (not mandatory - pls. refer to sample what we did in volume 1 Delhi)

•    It should introduce, underline, or exemplify the theme of the chapter (see below)

•    It should feature the European protagonist(s) and his Indian counterparts

•    It may (again, not mandatory) include verbal commentary / dialogue by the characters (one-liners) as inscriptions rather than speech or thought bubbles

Artistic style:

•    I am envisaging a style that mimics old adventure comics to deconstruct and parody the ‘colonial expectations’ that some European managers have when arriving in India (suggestions: Milton Caniff, Alexander Raymond) . Still, I am open to your suggestions (pls. send samples of your work)


Themes of the chapters:


1. Chapter I, in which our hero arrives with his family (his wife and his four year old son)  from the German province and moves into their Mumbai accommodation, a spacious flat in Bandra. The couple reminisce about the past years in Germany. They were unsuccessful; our hero’s career did not advance and he did not feel appreciated after his ‘hardship post’ in Delhi. His wife feels slightly estranged from her husband and therefore is glad that the family is reunited. They do some sightseeing in Mumbai. Key idea: The western manager is happy to have come back to India; his wife is a bit skeptical but open to new horizons.

2. Chapter II, in which our hero arrives at the office and meets his new co-workers. Although he thought he knew all about working with Indians, he is surprised to find out that Mumbai is different from Delhi. The workplace atmosphere is more casual and more competitive; and this time, he is not the CEO of the company but only one of several board members. Interviewing job applicants is tedious; his (female) Hindu assistant has an affair with a (male) Muslim employee; her parents put a stop to it at the office; turmoil ensues, the police are called and bribed to bugger off.  Key idea: The Western manager meets surprisingly competitive peers; dynamic staff, and experiences some chaotic days at the office.  

3. Chapter III, in which our hero grows increasingly discontent with his increasingly frustrated wife, and his wife grows increasingly discontent with her husband, her son’s nanny and India in general. Key idea: The hero’s marriage is deteriorating.

4. Chapter IV, in which our hero has to deliver results but finds it difficult to do so. He resorts to practicing the Indian art of Jugaad. A conference idea without much substance becomes a glamorous and very successfully floating hot-air balloon. Our hero is adaptable enough to play along, but the stress of improvisation and of travelling is taking its toll on his health. His affair with an Indian career woman makes things even more physically exhausting. He suffers a mild heart attack and ends in hospital. Key idea: Our hero’s life is too busy, and as a German perfectionist he takes things too seriously.

5. Chapter V, in which our hero’s life disintegrates, with his wife gone, his mistress gone missing and himself helpless in hospital where the sharks of the administration fleece him properly. After which he is born a-new, repents, and resumes his life at the office. Key idea: destruction and rebirth in the expat’s life

6. Chapter VI, in which tour hero reconciles with his family; the couple talk it over and ponder new (Indian) adventures together while in Goa on holiday. Key idea: a happy family and a Happy Ending. An ending that might well be a new beginning.


Character list

1. Protagonist (Male, 37 year old.,German, blonde, tall)

2. His Wife (German lady, 39 yrs. Old. Blond)

3.4Yr old boy

4. Female Hindu assistant (22 yrs.)

5.   Muslim employee(male)

6. Police

7. Staffs (Indian)

8. Her son’s nanny

9. Indian career woman (45 yrs.)

10. 2 board members (male, around 50 yrs.)



Budget: approx. 120/- USD (Euro 110,- / Rs. 8,500/-).


***If interested, pls. briefly summarize what you have understood + send some samples of your work. With your quote be clear what is included in your offering. Thank you. ***

Cartoon strip briefing

We are authoring a series of books on doing business in India; our first volume dealt with the expat in Delhi / NCR and appeared in Jun 2016 – our next book is on the Mumbai and Pune region. It is for this Mumbai volume that we are seeking a cartoonist.

Our book (format: 14,8 x 21 cm) has 6 chapters. We are looking for a cartoon strip / comic strip to open each chapter.

•    Each strip should be b/w (black and white) and consist of 4 panels (= 24 panels altogether)

•    Ideally, each strip should have a narrative sequence and end in a punchline (not mandatory - pls. refer to sample what we did in volume 1 Delhi)

•    It should introduce, underline, or exemplify the theme of the chapter (see below)

•    It should feature the European protagonist(s) and his Indian counterparts

•    It may (again, not mandatory) include verbal commentary / dialogue by the characters (one-liners) as inscriptions rather than speech or thought bubbles

Artistic style:

•    I am envisaging a style that mimics old adventure comics to deconstruct and parody the ‘colonial expectations’ that some European managers have when arriving in India (suggestions: Milton Caniff, Alexander Raymond) . Still, I am open to your suggestions (pls. send samples of your work)

Themes of the chapters:


1. Chapter I, in which our hero arrives with his family (his wife and his four year old son)  from the German province and moves into their Mumbai accommodation, a spacious flat in Bandra. The couple reminisce about the past years in Germany. They were unsuccessful; our hero’s career did not advance and he did not feel appreciated after his ‘hardship post’ in Delhi. His wife feels slightly estranged from her husband and therefore is glad that the family is reunited. They do some sightseeing in Mumbai. Key idea: The western manager is happy to have come back to India; his wife is a bit skeptical but open to new horizons.

2. Chapter II, in which our hero arrives at the office and meets his new co-workers. Although he thought he knew all about working with Indians, he is surprised to find out that Mumbai is different from Delhi. The workplace atmosphere is more casual and more competitive; and this time, he is not the CEO of the company but only one of several board members. Interviewing job applicants is tedious; his (female) Hindu assistant has an affair with a (male) Muslim employee; her parents put a stop to it at the office; turmoil ensues, the police are called and bribed to bugger off.  Key idea: The Western manager meets surprisingly competitive peers; dynamic staff, and experiences some chaotic days at the office.  

3. Chapter III, in which our hero grows increasingly discontent with his increasingly frustrated wife, and his wife grows increasingly discontent with her husband, her son’s nanny and India in general. Key idea: The hero’s marriage is deteriorating.

4. Chapter IV, in which our hero has to deliver results but finds it difficult to do so. He resorts to practicing the Indian art of Jugaad. A conference idea without much substance becomes a glamorous and very successfully floating hot-air balloon. Our hero is adaptable enough to play along, but the stress of improvisation and of travelling is taking its toll on his health. His affair with an Indian career woman makes things even more physically exhausting. He suffers a mild heart attack and ends in hospital. Key idea: Our hero’s life is too busy, and as a German perfectionist he takes things too seriously.

5. Chapter V, in which our hero’s life disintegrates, with his wife gone, his mistress gone missing and himself helpless in hospital where the sharks of the administration fleece him properly. After which he is born a-new, repents, and resumes his life at the office. Key idea: destruction and rebirth in the expat’s life

6. Chapter VI, in which tour hero reconciles with his family; the couple talk it over and ponder new (Indian) adventures together while in Goa on holiday. Key idea: a happy family and a Happy Ending. An ending that might well be a new beginning.


Character list

1. Protagonist (Male, 37 year old.,German, blonde, tall)

2. His Wife (German lady, 39 yrs. Old. Blond)

3.4Yr old boy

4. Female Hindu assistant (22 yrs.)

5.   Muslim employee(male)

6. Police

7. Staffs (Indian)

8. Her son’s nanny

9. Indian career woman (45 yrs.)

10. 2 board members (male, around 50 yrs.)